Shocking ‘ultraviolet portraits’ show the reality of sun damage

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Amira Msh (pictured) was one of the models who had a


Shocking ‘ultraviolet portraits’ show the reality of sun damage by revealing the skin imperfections that are invisible to the human eye

  • A series of black-and-white images – named ‘RAW’ – show the close-up blemishes we never usually see
  • UV light is a major cause of skin cancer, with sunlight being the main source, followed by tanning beds
  • UVA and B rays age skin cells and damage their DNA, which can trigger them to become cancerous  

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Shocking ‘ultraviolet portraits’ reveal the reality of sun damage that is invisible to the human eye.

A series of black-and-white images – named ‘RAW’ – show the close-up blemishes we never usually see. 

Photographer Pierre-Louis Ferrer, 31, said: ‘Each model offers the viewer an intimate view of his own being, which he cannot even perceive by himself.

‘This relationship of intimacy and trust is the opposite of our society where selfies and social networks project an idyllic vision of our lives. 

‘I am fascinated by the possibility to see beyond the visible.

‘I wanted to build a portrait series in UV to offer a more sensitive way to see people.

‘This series illustrates the raw and natural character of the human being, revealed by the technique of ultraviolet photography.’ 

UV light is part of the electromagnetic spectrum with a wavelength of between 400 and 10 nanometers. One nanometre is a billionth of a metre.

The human eye can generally detect ‘visible light’ between wavelengths of 380 and 700 nanometres.  

Mr Ferrer – a former optical engineer from Paris – used special camera equipment to zoom in on the models’ skin. 

UV light is a major cause of skin cancer, with sunlight being the main source, followed by tanning beds.

It is made up of three types of rays, with UVA and B ageing skin cells and damaging their DNA, leading to tumours. UVC would be even more harmful, however, it cannot penetrate the Earth’s atmosphere. 

Olivier Giachino (pictured) also posed for the photographs, which reveal the true damage of sun exposure

Amira Msh (left) was one of the models who had a ‘UV portrait’ shot. Olivier Giachino (right) also posed for the photographs

French photographer Pierre-Louis Ferrer captured the invisible blemishes of Chloã Hubert (pictured)

Lucien Melcheu (pictured) was also among the models who had their portrait shot with special camera equipment that zooms in on their imperfections

French photographer Pierre-Louis Ferrer captured the invisible blemishes of Chloã Hubert (left). Lucien Melcheu (right) was also among the models who had their portrait shot with special camera equipment that zooms in on their imperfections

Clãmence Michalon (pictured) posed for a shot, which revealed how UVA and B rays cause skin spots and marks that we cannot even see

Rudgy Padou (pictured) also has blemishes that are not visible to the naked eye

Clãmence Michalon (left) posed for a shot, which revealed how UVA and B rays cause skin spots and marks that we cannot even see. Rudgy Padou (right) also has blemishes that are not visible to the naked eye but may be serious

Manon Gaillard (pictured) was among those with the least severe UV damage

Vincent Valladon had blemishes across his face, particularly his nose

Manon Gaillard (left) was among those with the least severe UV damage. But Vincent Valladon (right) had blemishes across his face, particularly his nose. UV rays age skin cells and can harm DNA, which may trigger skin cancer

Lucien Melcheu's ear (pictured) has not escaped the damage

And another model's nose was also freckled with blemishes

Lucien Melcheu’s ear (left) has not escaped the damage and neither has another model’s nose (pictured right)

Chloã Hubert's arm and hand (pictured) are as freckled as her face

And Clãmence Michalon has a lot of invisible freckles around her mouth (pictured)

Chloã Hubert’s arm (left) is as freckled as her face. And Clãmence Michalon has a lot of skin spots around her mouth (right)

Zooming in on Olivier Giachino's knuckles (pictured) revealed skin damage can occur on any part of the exposed body

Vincent Valladon's knees even have invisible blemishes

Zooming in on Olivier Giachino’s knuckles (left) revealed skin damage can occur on any part of the exposed body. Vincent Valladon’s knees (right) even have invisible blemishes, which require special camera equipment to be seen 



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