Old Tesla models spontaneously bricking from worn-out memory chips

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The issue stems from a worn-out flash memory chip (arrow) embedded in the Multi-Media Controller board that activates the control screen and executes most functions


Old Tesla models spontaneously stop working due to worn-out memory chips that cost owners more than $1,800 to fix

  • Older Tesla models are malfunctioning due to worn-out memory chips
  • It’s happening in vehicles about four years old and older for Model X and S 
  • Teslas are consistently writing vehicle logs that the chip eventually burns out 

Some early Tesla models are spontaneously malfunctioning and could cost owners more than $1,800 to repair.

The issue stems from a worn-out flash memory chip embedded in the Multi-Media Controller board that activates the control screen and executes most functions.

This is happening in vehicles about four years old and older for Model X and S vehicles, which first came out in 2012.

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The issue stems from a worn-out flash memory chip (arrow) embedded in the Multi-Media Controller board that activates the control screen and executes most functions

The flash storage chip is becoming worn-out because Teslas are constantly writing vehicle logs, according to experts who have looked into the matter. 

Although the vehicles are still drivable, the cars rely on their screens for commands to function to their best ability – the control screen are found to go completely dark. 

Jason Hughes, from 057 Technology, told Insideevs, ‘The main issue is that this excessive log file writing causes eMMC flash wear.’

‘Flash memory is generally only rated for some tens of thousands of write cycles.

This is happening in vehicles about four years old and older for Model X and S (pictured) vehicles, which first came out in 2012

This is happening in vehicles about four years old and older for Model X and S (pictured) vehicles, which first came out in 2012

‘What happens is that the flash memory starts to fail when writings can no longer be completed.’

‘When one block fails, parts of the firmware may also become unreadable, leading to poor operation or failure of the MCU completely.’

Hughes has noted that he has done ‘repairs/replacements on over a dozen’ Telsas suffering from worn-out memory chips.

This issue surfaced this past May, following a comment from Tesla repairer Phil Sadow who said ‘Tesla’s got a problem. 

‘They create so many logs in the car, they write to [the chip] so fast that it basically burns them out. They have a finite amount of writes.’

‘When this burns out, you wake up to a black screen [in the car’s center console.] There’s nothing there. No climate control. You can generally drive the car, but it won’t charge.’

Jason Hughes, from 057 Technology, told Insideevs , 'The main issue is that this excessive log file writing causes eMMC flash wear'

Jason Hughes, from 057 Technology, told Insideevs , ‘The main issue is that this excessive log file writing causes eMMC flash wear’

And he continued to explain that this issue seems to occur after four years of use.

Vice noted that the malfunction brings to light Telas not abiding by the same rules as other manufactures when it comes to repairs. 

The issue highlights the fact that Tesla is not bound by the same rules when it comes to repair as other auto manufacturers. 

The firm is not a part of the  memorandum of understanding signed by other auto manufacturers in 2014, in which they agreed to sell parts to independent repair shops.

Although Tesla has yet to make a public statement, the firm's CEO Elon Must did tweet Hughes about the issue stating it 'should be much better at this point,' but did not elaborate about what changes or if and when they will be fixed

Although Tesla has yet to make a public statement, the firm’s CEO Elon Must did tweet Hughes about the issue stating it ‘should be much better at this point,’ but did not elaborate about what changes or if and when they will be fixed

This results in just a few few independent Tesla repair professionals and getting their hands on parts can be difficult — many parts are salvaged from wrecked Tesla vehicles.  

Although Tesla has yet to make a public statement, the firm’s CEO Elon Must did tweet Hughes about the issue stating it ‘should be much better at this point,’ but did not elaborate about what changes or if and when they will be fixed.

 

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